He was deported from Australia in 2017.

Authorities confirmed earlier on Friday that Turia, 34, had active charges against him. 
“Police will not be commenting any further on the nature of those charges or on any other specifics as the matter is now under investigation,” the spokesperson said.
Three investigations into the shooting, including an internal police inquiry, are now underway. The Independent Police Conduct Authority (IPCA) has been notified.
Deportees known as ‘501s’ are named after the character section of the Australian Migration Act that allows the cancellation of their visa. The majority have lived in Australia for most of their lives and have criminal records. 
Any non-citizen sentenced to 12 months in an Australian prison is subject to deportation, even if they completed their time behind bars years ago.
“Police is working to support Mr Turia’s family at this very difficult time,” Counties Manukau District Commander Superintendent, Jill Rogers, said in a statement on Friday.
“They have asked that they be allowed to grieve the loss of their family member in private and do not wish to speak with media at this time.”
Turia was shot three times by officers on Thursday night following a tense standoff lasting several hours. He died shortly after.
Supt Rogers said specialist negotiators had tried talking to the man after shots were fired into a neighbouring home. At around 8:30pm – two-and-a-half hours after police arrived at the Avis Ave address – the man emerged from the house holding a shotgun.
“He continued to show aggressive and erratic behaviour,” she said. “He showed up outside the house unexpectedly and brandished a firearm.”
Police fired three bullets at the man after he refused to lower the weapon.
Rogers said officers on the scene immediately administered first aid with the assistance of specialist paramedics.
Turia was taken to Middlemore Hospital, but was pronounced dead at 10:30pm.
“It is the worst possible decision for a police officer to take someone’s life,” Supt Rogers said. “Anything involving firearms is of the upper end of what police have to deal with.”