Shringla said that the two neighbours share “complex” relationship which is definitely dependent on the normal situation at the border.

Moscow: Foreign Secretary Harsh Vardhan Shringla on Wednesday said that India and China cannot have a “normal” bilateral relationship if there is “transgression” in the border areas.
Speaking at a meeting hosted by the Diplomatic Academy of Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Shringla said that the two neighbours share “complex” relationship which is definitely dependent on the normal situation at the border.
“As I told our friends in China, we cannot have a normal bilateral relationship if there is no peace and tranquility in our border areas. The relationship is definitely dependent on the normal situation at the border,” Shringla, on a two-day official visit to Moscow, said.
“We cannot have our troops having loss of life, having situation of transgression at the border and still go about a normal relationship?” he said.
Indian and Chinese troops have been locked in a bitter high-altitude standoff in eastern Ladakh since May last year following a violent clash in the Pangong lake areas. The border tension between the two countries flared up manifold in June last year when troops of both sides engaged in a violent face-off in Galwan Valley in eastern Ladakh, in which 20 Indian soldiers were martyred and several others injured. 
Last week, the two countries reached a consensus on disengagement in the North and South banks of Pangong lake that mandates both sides to “cease” forward deployment of troops in a “phased, coordinated and verifiable” manner, in a major development after a nine-month border standoff.
“In the last few days we (India and China) have started what is called a disengagement plan. We have come to some kind of understanding with China after nine months of negotiations on a plan of disengagement that would involve frontline troops, that were in close proximity to each other, I would say, going to their permanent bases and thereby preventing any chance of any mishap or miscalculation of troops being in close proximity to each other,? Shringla said.
“We do believe that in the next two or three days this process would have come to a conclusion and I think that’s a step in the right direction,” he said.
He further said that the border developments last year and multiple transgressions attempts along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) impacted the larger relationship.
“The developments last year in terms of very large number of troops were amassed on our borders, attempts at multiple transgressions along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) did create a situation that I suppose impacted the the larger relationship?” he said.